Being A Single Parent

I’m soon going to be a dad, and a single parent to boot. I don’t have a partner, and don’t intend to any time soon; my focus will be on my son.

People are often surprised when they hear I’m going to be a single parent. They can’t understand why I would do it by myself. But the reality is that I want to be a father; it really is as simple as that. I’m amazed to know that people are surprised by this, and becoming a single parent by choice.

It never occurred to me that this would even be an issue; it catches me off-guard when I discover that other people hold that view. They are, of course, entitled to their own views, but to have such an old-fashioned sentiment is eye-wateringly depressing. We have evolved as a society to a point when single mothers are becoming accepted – slowly – but single dads, perhaps because of their comparative rareity, are still a cause for some discussion.

When I first began exploring the possibilities of becoming a dad, I was pleasantly surprised by the response from the agencies I approached. None of them had any problems with a single person becoming a parent; in fact, they didn’t bat an eyelid, and I had to actually mention it first before it was even referenced. Barnardos – the agency I went with – obviously discussed it with me during the assessment phase, but it was more around how I would cope; what was my support network like, they wanted to know, and accepted that it was different to a couple’s network. But there was never any criticism, merely an acceptance that life would be different.

I have always been reassured by this, as well as by the positive responses of people whose opinion I value. No-one has been alarmed or worried, which is positive, and I’ve been able to explore my own strengths and weaknesses during the assessment stage. This has been a brilliant opportunity to reflect and take the chance to really critique myself, and it’s something that I wish everyone had the opportunity to do; it really is such a healthy thing to do.

So yes, single fatherhood beckons – but I will never truly be alone, as my own support network is strong and resilient. This is one of the strengths you get from the assessment; you realise who is important in your life, and what they can offer to you – and vice versa. It’s an excellent reminder of what is valued and valuable. People’s true colours come out of the woodwork, and you know how much relationships are needed.

Knowing that a child will soon be joining you to form a new family is incredibly exciting, and that puts everything else into perspective. I get to be a dad, and to have been judged worthy of a raising a child by myself is a a double honour – and a privilege.

3 comments

  • Dorothy A. Winsor  

    Big congrats to you!

    You’re probably getting all kinds of advice. A friend of mine who adopted two kids said the truest preview of parenthood he experienced was the old Steve Martin film, “Parenthood.” As a fellow adventure writer, I say that becoming a parent is starting out on an adventure, and like all adventures, you’re going to like some parts more than others. But all of it is worth it.

    The best of luck to you, Matthew.

  • Phill  

    You’ll be a great dad, Matthew. Your son will be loved and nurtured, and most especially listened to and valued as an individual. And you’ll both have lots of fun in the process!

    • MM  

      Bless you, Phill, thank you – this is the most rewarding thing I feel I’ve ever done. I can’t wait 🙂

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